Sourdough Loaf (Gluten-Free)

I am completely obsessed with this bread. 

But before I wax poetic about the utter loveliness of this loaf, I have to warn you that this is not a typical San Francisco sourdough. First of all, it’s gluten-free. Second of all, it’s incredibly dense — more like the malty bricks of rye that you’ll find in Scandinavian countries. Lastly, it’s flecked with seeds for color and crunch.

But if you are down for a naturally fermented, whole grain, earthy and deliciously dense (and moist) loaf of bread, this is a winner. The key to this bread is whole buckwheat groats, which bind into a beautiful batter when soaked and blended, allowing the bread to be naturally gluten-free. This is the exact same technique I like to use for pancakes and waffles. But I can’t take credit for  transferring the concept to bread; it came straight out of The Gefilte Manifesto. 

This recipe is quite flexible. You can swap out half of the buckwheat for another grain; use agave or barley malt in place of the maple syrup; omit the seeds or swap in another goodie. The only essential components are buckwheat, water and time.

I love this bread best sliced as thick as pound cake, toasted, with a heavy handed smear or nut butter or jam. This is my holiday present to you. Enjoy!

Love and Happy Holidays,

 

 

Sourdough Loaf (Gluten-Free)
  • 2 1/2 cups raw buckwheat groats
  • 1 cup water
  • 1 teaspoon sea salt
  • 2 tablespoons maple syrup
  • 2 tablespoons golden flax seeds, raw(optional)
  • 2 tablespoons pumpkin seeds, raw (optional)
  1. Pour your raw buckwheat groats into a bowl and cover with water. Allow to soak 8-12 hours, or overnight.
  2. After you buckwheat has soaked, drain it and rinse with fresh water. Transfer the buckwheat to the blender and add 1 cup of water. Blend until totally smooth.
  3. Transfer the batter to a sterile bowl. Cover with a clean cloth and allow to ferment for 24 hours. This will allow the dough to rise. It also has the added health benefit of introducing beneficial bacteria to the mix and pre-digesting your food!
  4. After 24 hours, the batter should be bubbling, having increased in volume and smell pleasantly sour. Stir in the salt, maple syrup, and 1 tablespoon each of the flax and pumpkin seeds.
  5. Preheat your oven to 350 degrees and heavily grease a large loaf pan.
  6. Transfer the batter to the loaf pan. Sprinkle over the remaining seeds. Bake for 1 hour, or until a toothpick inserted comes out clean.
  7. Allow to cool completely before removing from the pan and slicing (this is by far the hardest part of making the bread, but makes all the difference).

Notes

For a seed allergy, omit the seeds.

For a whole-foods, plant-based approach, omit the maple syrup and blend in 2 pitted dates.

http://www.theinclusivevegan.com/sourdough-loaf-gluten-free/

Homemade Cashew Yogurt

Yogurt was one of my go-to foods before I became vegan. I can remember swirling brown rice syrup into cream-top yogurt for a snack when I was little; when I was in college, I always had a tub of yogurt in the fridge to top with berries and nuts for breakfast or a substantial snack.

Finding non-dairy yogurts that do not have creepy additives, gums and stabilizers can be a challenge. Those that I have found tend to be coconut based (and thus taste of coconut) and cost a fortune.

So I decided to make my own out of soaked cashews and it’s totally amazing! Rich and creamy and tangy, it would be perfect with a swirl of sweetness from jam or maple. It does take 24 hours to culture, but takes only minutes of effort.

There are a few important things to keep in mind when making this yogurt. First, you absolutely must soak raw cashews. Soaking softens the cashews and allows them to blend up into a seamless cream. Soaking also gets rid of phytic acid and makes the nuts easier to digest, so that’s a bonus! Second, you must use non-chlorinated water, since chlorine can kill the probiotics that will culture your yogurt. Third, if you want a thicker, Greek style yogurt, you should reduce the water, add a tablespoon of melted coconut oil, or add a thickener like agar agar. Lastly, if you want to use your yogurt for savory applications, leave out the date and swap in a teaspoon of agave nectar (the sugar will help it culture, but should have a minimal impact on flavor).

This recipe will be a hit with your friends who are gluten-free or following a raw foods OR whole food plant-based OR paleo diet!

Love and yogurt,

 

 

Homemade Cashew Yogurt

Yield: 1 cup yogurt

  • 1 cup raw cashews, soaked overnight and drained
  • juice of 1/2 lemon
  • 1 date, pitted
  • pinch of sea salt
  • 3/4 cup filtered water
  • 2 probiotic capsules, OR 100 Billion Probiotic Cultures OR 1 tablespoon live, active non-dairy yogurt
  1. In a blender, combine cashews, lemon, date, salt and water until totally smooth.
  2. Transfer the blend to a clean, glass jar. Using a non-metal spoon, stir in your probiotics or live, active yogurt.
  3. Cover the jar with cheesecloth, a clean towel, or a paper towel and secure with a rubber band. Allow to culture in a warm spot for 24 hours.
  4. After the yogurt has cultured, transfer to the refrigerator. Keeps for 3 days.
http://www.theinclusivevegan.com/homemade-cashew-yogurt/

Sweet Potato Lasagna

Have you ever used a vegetable as a noodle? I’ve seen so many recipes floating around the web for zucchini noodles and spiralized vegetables lately, and with our annual Octuberfest party around the corner, I was inspired to experiment with sweet potato pasta.

Lasagna means layered, so in the most literal sense of the word, this is indeed a lasagna. But don’t expect any cheese, meat, tomatoes or grains; this casserole uses thinly sliced sweet potatoes as noodles, a savory white bean bechamel (thank you to My New Roots for the inspiration there!), a pumpkin herb sauce, and fresh greens.

The resulting lasagna is a harvest celebration, full of autumn flavors and comforting carbohydrates. This would be a great Thanksgiving side dish, but it also makes a cozy dinner for four (or, if you have appetites like me and Eric, for two).

Main or side, this is definitely the sort of dish you want to share with friends. It’s naturally gluten-free, and I’ve included a paleo-friendly modification in the notes below. Enjoy!

Love and Potato Pasta, 

 

 

Sweet Potato Lasagna

Yield: 4 servings

  • 1.5-2 pounds sweet potato
  • 1/4 cup refined coconut oil, melted and divided
  • 1 small onion, minced
  • 2 cloves garlic, minced and divided
  • 1 teaspoon dried thyme
  • 1 cup white wine
  • 1 15 ounce can pumpkin puree
  • 1 15 ounce can white beans, rinsed and drained
  • 1 lemon, juiced
  • 2 tablespoons nutritional yeast
  • 1/8 teaspoon ground nutmeg
  • 1 tablespoon white miso (optional)
  • 1/4 cup water
  • 5 cups raw greens (I like a combination of spinach and basil)
  1. Preheat oven to 400 degrees.
  2. For the noodles:
  3. Slice sweet potato as thinly as possible, into round "noodles." Set aside.
  4. For the pumpkin sauce:
  5. In a small sauce pan, heat 1 tablespoon of oil over medium heat. Add the onion and saute until the edges begin to caramelize, about 5 minutes. Add 1 clove of garlic and thyme; stir for 1 minute. Deglaze with white wine and allow to simmer until reduced by 1/3. Add the pumpkin puree and stir through until the sauce has an even consistency. Taste for salt and pepper. Set aside.
  6. For the white bean bechamel:
  7. In a blender, combine 3 tablespoons refined coconut oil, white beans, lemon juice, nutritional yeast, nutmeg and water until creamy. Season with salt and pepper.
  8. To assemble:
  9. Grease an 8x8 casserole dish. Add a layer of sweet potato to the bottom. Add half the greens on top, followed by half the pumpkin sauce and half the white bean bechamel. Repeat: sweet potato, greens, pumpkin, white beans.
  10. Bake for 1 hour, or until the sweet potato is soft.
  11. Allow to cool slightly before serving.

Notes

For a paleo-friendly or SCD-friendly recipe, replace the white beans with 2 cups of cashews, soaked overnight and drained.

For a soy-free recipe, omit the miso.

http://www.theinclusivevegan.com/sweet-potato-lasagna/

Roasted Red Pepper Dip

When I’m the only vegan at a potluck (which is nearly always), I feel a responsibility to represent my cuisine well. It’s certainly not a burden; I take enormous pleasure in cooking for those I love. But for as long as I’ve been vegetarian of vegan (almost 18 years), I’ve heard things like:

You must only eat rabbit food. 

Isn’t is bland?

Don’t you get bored? 

I really believe with all my heart that choosing plant-based food over animal products has the ability to mitigate problems like climate change, soil degradation and animal suffering. And it’s good for our bodies, too. But I’ve never found it a successful strategy to talk about these things. The most persuasive way I’ve found to represent the joy and abundance of a vegan way of life is through sharing amazing food that is as far away from boring and bland as possible. That’s how you can open minds and start dialogues.

This salmon colored spread has never failed to blow people away. It takes less than 10 minutes to whip up and is great for paleo, gluten-free and whole foods plant based friends. It has become my go-to potluck dish and I hope you’ll bring it to your next party.

Love and Potluck Revolutions,

 

 

Roasted Red Pepper Dip
  • 1 12 ounce jar roasted red peppers, drained
  • 1/2 cup nutritional yeast
  • 1 cup raw walnuts
  • 1 cup raw cashews
  • 1 teaspoon garlic powder
  • 1 teaspoon smoked paprika
  • 1 teaspoon sea salt
  • Black pepper, to taste
  1. Add all ingredients to a food processor or high speed blender. Blend until totally smooth.

Notes

For a nut-free version, replace the walnuts and cashews with sunflower seeds.

http://www.theinclusivevegan.com/roasted-red-pepper-dip/

Spinach and Artichoke Dip

When you think spinach and artichoke dip, you most likely imagine something warm and gooey, bubbling to the brim with cheese and mayonnaise. While that style of cooking has it’s place, this is a totally different kind of dip.

Think of this as a much more interesting version of hummus. It is cool, tangy and bright with a beautiful green hue from raw spinach. It goes perfectly with cold crudites or warm, toasted bread, or slathered on a sandwich.

This is an incredibly easy and impressive spread to have on hand as the more languid summer days become distant memory and the weather works to figure out how soon to cool off. This dip is good with warm or cool accompaniments and takes a mere 5 minutes to throw together (if you soak your cashews, that does extend the total time, but adds a mere few seconds of effort).

Love and Dips,

 

 

Spinach and Artichoke Dip
  • 6 ounce jar marinated artichoke hearts
  • 1 cup cashews, soaked overnight and drained
  • 1/4 cup nutritional yeast flakes
  • 1 cup spinach, raw
  • juice of 1 lemon
  • 1 tablespoon olive oil
  • 1 clove garlic
  • sea salt and black pepper, to taste
  1. Drain the artichoke hearts, reserving the liquid.
  2. In a food processor, combine all ingredients until a smooth paste forms. If you need a little extra liquid to thin it out, use some extra olive oil or the artichoke juice.
http://www.theinclusivevegan.com/spinach-artichoke-dip/

 

Wild Blueberry and Rosemary Sorbet

Did you know you can make creamy sorbet using applesauce as a base? It’s true!

There are lots of recipes on the internet for banana soft serve- essentially blending up frozen bananas until they reach the texture of ice cream. If you haven’t tried this out yet, definitely give it a whirl. This method totally works because bananas are both sweet and starchy. Apples don’t have starch but they do have a fiber called pectin, which acts as a thickener. They also have a much more neutral flavor, making applesauce a great base for any fruit flavored sorbet.

You may not think to pair blueberry and rosemary together, but it’s a fantastic combination. You can, however, think of this recipe as a blueprint. You could swap the rosemary for lavender (another great combo) or omit the herbs altogether. If you’re not a fan of blueberries, try raspberries or cherries.

Love and sorbet,

 

 

Wild Blueberry and Rosemary Sorbet
  • 2 cups applesauce
  • 16 ounces wild blueberries, frozen
  • 1/4 cup honey or other liquid sweetener
  • 3/4 cup coconut sugar or granulated cane sugar
  • 2 tablespoons fresh rosemary, finely chopped
  • 1 teaspoon sea salt
  • 1 teaspoon vanilla
  1. Blend all ingredients in a blender until totally smooth. Since you've used frozen blueberries, the base is already chilled and ready to churn in your ice cream maker as soon as you are!
http://www.theinclusivevegan.com/wild-blueberry-rosemary-sorbet/

 

Spiced Carrot Juice

After every orthodontist appointment I had growing up, I would get a gift certificate to the McDonalds two doors down for a McFlurry. But what was my preferred post-dental treat of choice?  Carrot juice.  Yep, carrot juice from the crunchy, kitschy vegetarian restaurant next door.

I absolutely love carrot juice and it still feels like a special treat to me.  But juice can be expensive to buy, and I don’t really want to invest in a DIY juicer (I have neither the patience to clean it, nor the space to store it).

Then the other day, when my carrot juice craving struck, Eric suggested I just make it in the blender.   Brilliant!  This juice uses a nut-milk style method and is totally genius. Not only does it allow me to have fresh juice whenever I want, but I can customize the flavors.  To this batch I added a hunk of ginger and a dash of cardamom.  Holy of holies was this delicious.  Smooth and creamy and sweet and spicy.  And it only cost $0.89 to make.

Carrot juice for the win!

Love and Weird Hippy Treats,

 

 

P.S. Wondering what to do with the leftover pulp?  Stay tuned!

Cardamom Carrot Juice
  • 1 lb. carrots, roughly chopped
  • 1/2 inch fresh ginger root
  • 1/4 teaspoon ground cardamom
  • 3 cups water
  1. In a blender, combine all ingredients on high until smooth (about 90 seconds in a high speed blender).
  2. Using a nut milk bag (or similar device), pour the juice through the bag over a large bowl to catch the pulp. Squeeze the bag to extract every last bit of juice.
  3. Transfer the juice to a bottle. Store in the refrigerator for 3-4 days.
http://www.theinclusivevegan.com/spiced-carrot-juice/

Power Latte

PubMed is my new favorite website.  Since my lovely friend Kaitlin was diagnosed with ALS, I have been spending a lot of time browsing through the National Library of Medicine, reading every peer-reviewed article I can find about non-drug based interventions to autoimmune disorders.

What I see echoed again and again through the pages of these articles is this: food is medicine.  Whole plant foods have an incredible power to heal the body.   Of course, there is no known cure for ALS.  But there is a wealth of information available about cellular similarities among people with autoimmune diseases and food-based therapies that may offer meaningful interventions.

Turmeric is one of these seemingly magical, medicinal foods.  It has a wonderful ability to help neutralize free radicals- those pesky extra electrons floating around which create a cascade of volatility in your body.  Antioxidants, like those found in turmeric, stop oxidative stress in it’s tracks by grabbing those extra electrons.  And if you eat turmeric with a dash of black pepper, it increases the bioavailability of the available nutrients, magnifying it’s impact.

As enlightening as these research articles may be, they don’t come with recipes.  In reading about the health benefits of turmeric for all people, and especially those with autoimmune disorders, I wanted to come up with a delicious antioxidant power latte.  This latte not only uses turmeric in it’s most bioavailable form, but it also takes advantage of the antioxidant powerhouse, the goji berry, which contains high concentrations of melatonin– a powerful antioxidant for the brain (especially wonderful for those with ALS).

This latte is medicinal and delicious.  It uses a combination of medicinal herbs and whole plant foods to offer a yummy, antioxidant boost to your daily diet.

Love and Healing,

 

 

Power Latte
  • 1 cup non-dairy milk
  • 1 inch fresh turmeric, sliced OR 1/2 teaspoon ground turmeric
  • 1/2 inch fresh ginger, sliced
  • 1-2 medjool dates, pitted
  • 1/4 cup goji berries, soaked (to soften)
  • 1/8 teaspoon cardamom
  • 1 teaspoon vanilla extract
  • pinch of sea salt
  • pinch of black pepper
  • cinnamon, for serving
  1. In a blender, combine milk, turmeric, ginger, dates, goji berries, cardamom, vanilla, sea salt and black pepper until totally smooth.
  2. Pour the mixture into a small saucepan and warm through.
  3. Pour your latte into a mug and dust with cinnamon.

Notes

For a nut-free latte, use soy, rice, or seed milk.

http://www.theinclusivevegan.com/power-latte/

Avocado Shake

avocado-milkshake

Happy New Year!  

I love the clean slate feeling of a fresh year.  I love the opportunity to reflect on all the wonderful things that happened the year before and wonder, with anticipation, what new friends and new adventures the new year will bring.

And I love new years resolutions.  I first became vegan because of a new years resolution.  I was doing a different challenge every month for a year, and my friend Julie asked if I’d like to go vegan with her for a month.  It sounded fun, so I figured I’d give it a try.  And that was the starting point of this beautiful adventure.

Many people use new years resolutions to set unrealistic goals and then self flagellate when they don’t achieve them.  I really see no point in this.  You have this blank page of a year- why muddy it with your own self loathing?  If you want to set a new years resolution at all, think about something you are curious about.  What would it look like to start exploring it?  What would be the first step?  Start there and see where the journey takes you.

This Avocado Shake is something I’d forgotten about until recently.  I was flipping through images from early drafts of my cookbook (another new years resolution project).  This shake didn’t end up making the final cut, but it’s the perfect type of new years recipe:  healthy, fast, easy.

It may sound strange, but I promise you it isn’t.  It’s actually a very common Brazilian recipe.  Brazilians blend avocados with milk and sugar;  I blend them with coconut milk and a little agave or coconut nectar.  This is a great recipe to make the morning after a long, indulgent night.  Avocados make the shake thick and creamy, while adding lots of fiber, vitamin k and vitamin e.  Coconut adds lots of medium chain triglycerides and a tropical flavor.

It’s a perfect recipe, no matter what diet you’re on.  Though it is an especially great recipe for my loved ones who are managing their neurological diseases through diets rich in veggies and coconut!

Love and Happy New Year,

Amanda Signature

 

 

Avocado Shake

Yield: 1-2 servings

This makes quite a thick shake. But the beauty of the recipe is that you can adjust any ingredient to suit your preferences. If you like it thinner, add more coconut milk. If you like it sweeter, add some ripe banana, one medjool date, or a little extra coconut nectar. If you want to add some extra veggies, through in a handful of spinach- it will yield a bright green color. Enjoy!

  • 1 ripe avocado, pitted
  • 1 1/2 cups coconut milk
  • 1 teaspoon vanilla extract
  • handful of ice
  • 1/2 tablespoon agave, coconut nectar, or maple syrup (optional)
  • pinch salt
  1. Blend all ingredients until totally smooth.

Notes

For a paleo diet: use coconut nectar.

For a whole foods plant based diet: replace the liquid sweetener with a medjool date or 1/2 ripe banana.

For a raw foods diet: use the meat and water from one young coconut.

http://www.theinclusivevegan.com/crispmas/

 

Muhammara

img_5191

A few weekends ago, Eric and I went to Governor’s Island for a Unicycle Festival.  We discovered the festival around 11:48am on a Saturday, and the festival began at 1pm.  Now, usually I am a snob about jarred peppers.  But we had some on hand, and I wanted to quickly whip up a picnic lunch so we could get on our way.  I threw everything in the blender, grabbed some bread and a few cut up veggies, and we were on our way.

The Unicycle Festival turned out to be disappointingly tiny, but the dip was delicious!  And given how ludicrously simple it was to make, I have since been persuaded to change my snobbish ways.

This makes a delicious accompaniment to the Chesapeake Cakes, but it’s also a fantastic picnic or party dip.

Love and Jarred Peppers,

Amanda Signature

 

 

Muhammara
  • 1 12 ounce jar roasted red peppers
  • 1 cup walnuts
  • 1/3 cup whole wheat breadcrumbs
  • 2 tablespoons extra virgin olive oil
  • juice of 1 lemon
  • 1 teaspoon date syrup or other sweetener
  • 1/2 teaspoon ground cumin
  • 1/4 teaspoon ground cayenne pepper
  1. Place all ingredients in a high speed blender of food processor. Blend until completely smooth.

Notes

For a gluten-free diet, use gluten-free breadcrumbs.

For a Paleo diet, omit the breadcrumbs entirely and increase the walnuts by 1/2 cup.

For a Whole Foods Plant Based Diet, omit the olive oil.

For the Specific Carbohydrate Diet, omit the date syrup.

http://www.theinclusivevegan.com/muhammara/